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believed them. today's report says that much never happen again. >> learning about science may become a thing of the past for school children in indonesia. the government wants to cancel science class is to make more room for religion and nationalism. teachers say it is a move backwards. >> learning about the newton laws of motion by launching a rocket. it is a fun exercise for children around the world. indonesian children might soon miss out on such experiments. if the government goes ahead with its plan to take science out of the curriculum. >> science is cool, lots of useful objects can be made through science. with science, we can create unique objects. when i grow up, i want to be a professor in biotechnology. professor in biotechnology.
a science out of the curriculum. >> science is cool. lots of beautiful, objects can be made through science. when i grow up, i want to be a professor in biotechnology. >> the education ministry says there too overburdened for such causes and they want schools to focus mainly on religion, nationalism, the indonesian language, and math. that would mean the end of signs causes so they could learn about their country's frequent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. >> they are the right age to learn. they are ready to learn the basic concepts of science. what about their future? >> fascinated to listen to listen to the explanation about the many volcanoes. science is important to learn the way of thinking. they say it is necessary for them to be able to compete internationally. indonesia's's booming economy is growing more than 6% per year and they urgently need to educate their young regeneration. compared with neighboring countries, they have few scientists add that not many can afford to study abroad. >> we cannot rely on a small group. we need a critical mass of educated, sophisticated middle
is low. daphne koller, a computer science professor at stanford, is one of coursera's founders. >> i think by opening up education for free to everyone around the world, they're going to turn education, high-quality education, from a privilege to a basic human right, so that anyone, no matter their social, economic or family circumstances, has access to the best education. >> reporter: those lofty goals-- the experience of teaching thousands of students and the possibility of future profits-- are what got these courses going. professors from top universities are signing up, even though they are not paid by the providers. eventually, universities may share revenues they receive-- when there are revenues-- with the professors. and those star professors have inspired intense student interest in the courses, says coursera's other co-founder, andrew ng. >> most people today will never have access to a princeton, stanford, cal tech class. but now, if you wake up tomorrow morning and you decide you want to take a cal tech class, you can. you can just sign up for one, and it's free. >> repor
with venture capital money, offering classes in science, technology, engineering, and math. universities came on board, hoping to reach more students than they previously could, and to improve instruction both on and off campus using online technology. thrun says early results are promising. >> we have some data on how work for some of the classes, we've shown that the average point score of students taking those classes online is higher, significantly higher than taking it in the classroom. that's kind of mind-blowing. >> reporter: he says teachers are learning new strategies that are more effective than the traditional lecture. >> it's not my lecturing that changes the student, but it's the student exercise. so our courses feel very much like video games, where you're being bombarded with exercise after exercise. that's very different from the way i teach at stanford, where i'm much more in a lecturing mode. >> porter: at coursera, says online courses aren't dominated by a few aggressive students in a classroom. >> on the online web site, we have these things we call in- video quizzes, wher
, celeste ward gventer, thank you. >> thank you so much, judy. >> thank you. >> brown: next, a science and medical story involving research from the frontiers of robotics. ray suarez looks at how doctors are using high tech toys to help people with special needs. >> what's your favorite game? >> "mario cart," the original. >> reporter: in a carefully monitored session that seems more like playtime than therapy, researchers at the university of notre dame have enlisted an unusual therapist to assist their studies of children with autism, a two foot robot named kelly. >> i got to skip school today, because of you guys. >> that is so cool. i am so glad. >> reporter: kelly is working with 11 year old liam mcguire and a co-therapist of the human kind, kristen wier. >> for liam, kelly has become a friend. i mean, he's very excited to see her. you can tell, he lights up when he sees kelly, he leans forward, his posture changes, his eye contact is much stronger. i think it's something he can relate to, and feel successful with. >> i like to play soccer. >> reporter: robots, like this one are b
is a big deal. getting the kids in school today studying the sciences and technology and engineering and the math to stay in this country and getting a path to his citizenship and dealing with the competencies' to grow jobs. if you can deal with those issues, we would be off to a great start. >> you have many of your clients in the manufacturing business. looking at the broader economic shift, what do you do in a post- manufacturing world to provide the numbers of jobs that america needs? because it does not appear clear yet. >> we have roughly 12 million jobs through the great recession lost. we have filled about half of those. it will still take some more between five-seven years to get unemployment down to the 5% range. and you are right, the skill sets are starting to move. it will have to be able to move with that prepared the first that -- we will have to be able to move with that. the first up is immigration reform and job training. >> you are a guide in ohio and you have lost your job at a car plant and you are 55 years old. immigration reform will not help you much, is it? >
of a magazine. "the times" that you read, monday, sports, wednesday, science, dining, thursday, home and style, friday, arts, saturday -- in new york, you get a special sports section, but the rest of the country does not. so what happens? "the times" did very well, in part, because of advertising. we are now in the period of the vietnam war. a lot of advertisers did not want to be on the same page as the vietcong, blood, gore. that is why we started with the normandy invasion. then it was kind to be on the same page because it was us against them. but here we have us against them and us against us. so these special sections that was a great advertising boom, they were short on content sometimes. in my book i used the term "the times" light. what happens, they would dummy down these sections. if you read the sections, sometimes you know, they are extremely prolific, and they have no point. there are some strong articles on alzheimer's and things like that, but there is also some stuff there that is a really soft. but this helped "the times" immeasurably. helped contribute to prosperity. rosend
austrian finance minister of climate change science. financeok our former scienc minister around the world read only for started, he said humans were not responsible and was w opposed to any action on climate change. we traveled for four weeks. i took into the u.s., the u.k. by the end, i got him to a point where he said, "climate change is happening and humans have probably cost part of it." i was able to convince him somewhat of the need to switch to renewable energy. we need to make these transitions right away toward wind and solar, clean energy, because if we don't, we are going to see more and more of these devastating extreme weather events that occurred not just australia, the people all around the world. >> anna rose, how sycophant is the position of the u.s. on climate change >> -- how significant is the position of u.s. on climate change? >> it is extremely significant countries like the street and around the world. the rest of the world has started to act around the world. the europe has been doing it for those big stepsad will not happen until we get the united states to put a
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. cheryl: what do you get when you mix judaism and beer brewing? well, according to the next guest, you get an american-jewish celebration beer. small business, big ideas, this is the best. founder of scmaltz brewers, called hebrew. what inspired you? >> well, hebrew beer is the first and only jewish celebration beer in the united states, high end craft beer marketed to the jewish community and anybody else who loves great beer. cheryl: all my jewish friends are wine drinkers, is there the population? >> yes, we get the question all the time. i thought jews didn't drink beer. that was going to be the bumper sticker in the beginning. we play with stereotypes, and it's important to have a wonderful high end craft beer to celebrate jewish tradition, the calendar, but, also, now craft beer is popular and growing we want to make beers to stand with the best craft beers. cheryl: sales impressive, 125,000 cases sold, $3.5 million in sales. that's not small, th
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back. we have breaking medical news tonight. the flu outbreak that has been spreading so fast now qualifies as an epidemic according to the national institute of health. here's what he just told cnn. >> if you look at the charts that the cdc put out on their website, it clearly has gone above that threshold, so we're into what would classically be described as a flu epidemic. it's still on the uptick, and usually when you're above that baseline in the flu season, you stay there for about 12 weeks. we're right now at about week five or so. so we still have a way to go. >> long way to go, it's expected to be the worst flu season in years. more than half of the states already reporting widespread outbreaks and officials are saying the cases they're seeing are more severe than last year. emergency rooms across the country are overflowing. boston has declared a public health emergency. more than 2,000 people have been hospitalized. at least 18 children have died from the flu.
came to science class in the middle of first period, aimed a shotgun at a fellow student and pulled the trigger. he didn't stop there. >> he didn't try to engage a second student that he named and tried to shoot him and missed. the teacher at that point was trying to get the students out of the classroom and engaged the shooter who had numerous rounds of shotgun shells in a 12 gauge shotgun. numerous rounds in his pocket. he engaged the suspect with in conversation. a campus supervisor showed up, was outside the classroom and together they engaged in conversation with this young man and at one point he put the shotgun down and police officers were able to take him into custody. >> shepard: that, they say, may have saved the day. still, two targets, one hit and one missed. the sheriff says the gunman had as many as 20 rounds in his pockets when they arrested him. now we are getting some clues as to why he may have done. this the sheriff says the suspect and the victim had some sort of dialogue this morning. but he could not confirm reports the suspect had been bullied or that he was
. >> we'll take a quick look. >> reporter: to what looked like a scene from a science fiction movie. >> believe it or not, these timbers washed in from the ocean or bay. >> this timber right here. >> absolutely. >> are this washed in -- >> all this debris you see washed in from the tidal surge. >> reporter: this station, the end of the line for the city's number one subway train, is called south ferry. three years ago it was brand new. built at a cost of more than half a billion dollars. now it's in ruins. sandy broke records for the biggest waves in new york harbor, for the biggest surge in new york city, and for the lowest pressure ever north of north carolina. what was the impactful part of sandy was the surge at 12, 15 feet. that surge had never been seen in new york city before. >> when we were here the water was just below this level. >> reporter: nearly a month after our first interview. >> you can see the rust. >> reporter: this time dressed in a suit and tie, he took us back underground. >> it wasn't a rebuilding as some of our other stations. that was a brand new tunnel st
and science editor john fowler, ktvu channel 2 news lance armstrong totaled the associated press he plans to answer anything winfrey asks honestly and candiedly. army has vehemently denied doping for years and last year was stripped of his 7 tour de france the times after the u.s. anti-doping agency found that he used steroids and blood transfusions. >>> the treasury department says it will not menta trillion dollar coin to avoid getting around the debt ceiling. some lawyers and economists suggested a plan in which the treasury simply administered a coin worth a trillion dollars and have it deposit intoed federal reserve. that would allow continued spending in the absence of a vote to raise the debt ceiling. >>> back in action, the nhl lockout is officially over. when the players will be hitting the ice again. >>> it's getting colder in the bay area. how long will it last? meteorologist mark tamayo is up next with when warmer weather is expected to move in. i have evidence that proves my dad's a space alien. he speaks a weird uage. [ gargling ] [ gargling ] he drinks green stuff. he says
to go to that is on the far side of the moon that can be the robotic science can do the mining for the ice crystals and convert that into hydrogen and oxygen which is fuel the conference recently as following a workshop that has been sent out in the international learning basis by practicing on the island of hawaii to assemble a large number of large objects. you put the first one down and where are they expected? another one down at some distance away how do you put them together? if it's on hawaii, you do that through a satellite back to the mission control. so you prove that you can do something like that here in the united states. then we do it at the moon. why am i so enthusiastic about that? because that's exactly what we want to do at mars. we want to put people on the moon of mars who can then assemble the base we will then send people and we should assure ourselves we should protect crew members from radiation as much as possible before they ever go somewhere and that's the moon, too. >> kevin has a two-part question and i should ask the second part first. do you belie
. but the key thing is he says science and technology could be a way to improve the economy. from what we've seen on our visits though,, both he and perhaps google's schmidt might have their work cut out for them. one of our earlier visits we were shown what appeared to be an internet center at a library. in fact it was a intranet center. the folks in north korea have almost no access to the real worldwide web and in our last visit, jon, we saw more mobile phones out in the streets but there is a hitch there too. these mobile phones can not connect outside of north korea. in fact they're more dumb than smartphones. however who knows. schmidt might have the idea to get a few more phones, google phones, google tablets google searches in north korea. jon: information wants to be free. greg palkot in london. thank you. jenna: it is a known fact that obesity is not good for your health but seems some risks get more attention than others. a new survey finding while most americans realize carrying too much pounds can contribute to heart disease and diabetes there are other series -- serious cons
they realize and could be sackifiesing their safety. we'll talk to our science editor. and then lawmakers but theed heads on the debt ceiling and the gun control debate. we'll get a preview, after the break. yes she is, yes she is. [ bop ] [ male announcer ] could've had a v8. 100% vegetable juice, with three of your daily vegetable servings in every little bottle. with three of your daily vegetable servings excuse me, sir i'm gonna have to ask you to power down your little word game. i think your friends will understand. oh no, it's actually my geico app...see? ...i just uh paid my bill. did you really? from the plane? yeah, i can manage my policy, get roadside assistance, pretty much access geico 24/7. sounds a little too good to be true sir. i'll believe that when pigs fly. ok, did she seriously just say that? geico. just click away with our free mobile app. >> we have just learned that moments ago, president obama signed into law the first of the sandy relief bills, to provide $9.7 billion in flood insurance funds to victims of super storm sandy. congress passed the bill on friday. th
you solve it. whatever your business challenge, science and evidence based drug and alcohol treatment center. where your addiction stops and your new life begins. call now. >>> hi there, i'm susan hendricks, boston, mayor has declared a public health emergency due to the flu. since october one, there are 100 cases of confirmed flu in the city, more than all of last year's numbers. the board of aig has decided not to join a lawsuit against taxpayers over the bailout that saved the company from bankruptcy in 2008. the board says the reasons behind that decision will become clear through court filings in the coming weeks. and dallas owner mark cuban has been fined over a tweet. he quoted he failed in his attempt to fix the officiating in this league. back to you. >>> susan, thank you, reports of a lion on the loose in north virginia turned out to be exaggerated. using robotics and mobile technology, verizon innovators have made it possible for teachers to teach, and for a kid... nathan. tadpole. ... to feel like a kid again. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solu
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ male announcer ] jill and her mouth have lived a great life. but she has some dental issues she's not happy about. so i introduced jill to crest pro-health for life. selected for people over 50. pro-health for life is a toothpaste that defends against tender, inflamed gums, sensitivity and weak enamel. conditions people over 50 experience. crest pro-health for life. so jill can keep living the good life. crest. life opens up when you do. [ male announcer ] when diarrhea hits, kaopectate stops it fast. powerful liquid relief speeds to the source. fast! [ male announcer ] stop the uh-oh fast with kaopectate. >> a remake of the' 60s movie "django" has been released. in tonight's ireport interview, costar samuel jackson said it all started with a simple phone call. >> that is what happens the phone rings and i pick it up, and hey man, we have a script. i go from there. hi, i'm samuel jackson. >> hi, this is quentin, i'm answering your ireport que
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> half past the hour now, let's take a look at the headlines. back to the office, secretary of state hillary clinton is returning to work tomorrow morning. it will be clinton's first day back since she was sidelined by a stomach virus, followed by a concussion, and blood clot in her brain. she was released wednesday from a new york hospital. according to her schedule, clinton will meet with her assistant secretaries tomorrow morning, that meeting will be her only event of the day. >>> a former u.s. senator will take the spotlight monday. president obama plans to nominate former nebraska senator chuck hagel to be the next secretary of defense. the announcement is expected to tomorrow. a source familiar with the process tells cnn, the white house spent time today calling senators to try to build support for hagel's nomination. >>> parents in new york are making backup plans tonight. waiting to hear if their children will have to find other ways to get to school in the morning. the un
science visits to the moon, clearly, we are the leaders of lunar knowledge . we should be the leader of the international nations that come together regardless of whether we choose to send government people back there, once the government gets a program going, it is rather hard to cancel it, put in a sunset clause to humans going back to the moon. that probably wouldn't sit too well. but i think this administration has charted a course that is beyond government people back to the moon. we can do commercial things, looking for ice water, separating that in to hydrogen oxygen which is rocket fuel we can be the ones, the united states, that brings together other nations to invest in an ongoing transportation system . understanding and becoming leaders and experts in space transportation is where we should direct our efforts. well, he's quite the visionary. you can go to act apollo.comto enter into the contest. they have had over 200 flights and charging $100,000 for each flight. but the 22 lucky winners get to go for free. that is an adventure of a lifetime. it dad's show and he was ups
then tried to shoot another student but missed. a science teacher confronted the suspect and kconvinced him to drop his handgun. >>> a judge has postponed the arraignment for james holmes, the man accused of killing 12 people at a colorado movie theater last summer, scheduled to happen today. the defense requested more time. many of the victims' families were disappointed by the delay. one father yelled, rot in hell, holmes. the arraignment is scheduled for march. prosecutors will then have two months to decide whether to seek the death penalty. raj? >> okay, thank you. we have a programming note for you. a special all-new two-hour edition of "dateline" will feature the case of michelle le. >> needless to say you don't like her. >> yeah. that's clear. >> tonight's episode will feature never before scene video of her convict ed killer in the interrogation room, giselle he is at testeban. date line said they were intrigued because of the efforts by le's family, search team and investigators. they talk in great lengths about electronic evidence now used in pros are cuting many murder cases. >>
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. for their "destination wedding." double miles you can "actually" use. but with those single mile travel cards... [ bridesmaid ] blacked out... but i'm a bridesmaid. oh! "x" marks the spot she'll never sit. but i bought a dress! a toast... ...to the capital one venture card. fly any airline, any flight, anytime. double miles you can actually use. what a coincidence? what's in your wallet? [ all screaming ] watch the elbows ladies. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. this reduced sodium soup says it may help lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just have to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male anno
, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to "morning joe." the co-founders of a small business, their 3-year-old small business on the rise growing at a rate of 200% each year. >> that's good. a good rate of growth. good to see you. first things first, a new father, paul. congratulations. new year's eve baby. >> seven minutes before the ball dropped. snow maybe there >> how much sleep have you gotten zblnt maybe there's a reason you're here and not with the baby. we want to bring you guys in, you have first such a great story in school together and also facing the headwinds a lot of people have faced the last few years with the economy and succeeding. paul, i start with you. how did you guys get together on this and why did you choose shirts? >> a great question. we weren't always shirt makers. we were in business school in 2007 in the uk and we were heading to world finance in 2007, seemed to be the direction to go. as luck would have it and life have it we graduated the da
for the san francisco exploratorium. the named science museum closed it's doors last week. its exhibited will be packed up and taken to the exploratorium's new home at pier at the embarcadero. >>> help is on the way to the victims of superstorm is any. >>> could more rain be on your way for your workweek? our meteorologist mark tamayo has your complete bay area forecast. so we could head back to the dealership. [ male announcer ]it's pra. test drive! but we still need your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a jetta. that's the power of german engineering. get $0 down, $0 due at signing, $0 deposit, and $0 first month's payment on any new volkswagen. visit vwdealer.com today. u-verse high speed internet. you know, in my day you couldn't just start streaming six ways to sunday. you'd get knocked off. and sometimes, it took a minute to download a song. that's sixty seconds, for crying out loud. we know how long a minute is! sitting, waiting for an album to download. i still have back problems. you're only 14 and a half. he doesn't have back prob
was an editor, what they call an acquiring nature. worked in social science and history for a number of years and became executive editor and editor-in-chief of perhaps two different directors. c-span: what did you learn in that job that you applied to your book on teddy roosevelt or harry truman? >> guest: well first of all you learned something about writing. i read hundreds of manuscripts over the years. you learned what is good writing and what is not good writing. i was very particular. if even plus a famous author submitted i would turn it down or i would say get yourself an editor and rewrite this. it's an interesting story whatever it was and of course i made a few enemies by doing that. and then there were the authors who wrote like a dream, and i loved publishing them. i have also instituted a very large translation program at harvard when i had the power to do this. we probably published the most important history books coming out of france over a 10 or 12 years period. with the french were writing about was what they called the history over four or 500 years, not the history of 10
science journalist debra blum, author of "the poisoner's handbook." she said cyanide is a horrible way to go. and screaming part of it. >> they'll talk about the classic death scream. almost an involuntary contraction of your dying muscles. >> it's almost a trademark of cyanide? >> it absolutely is. >> how did the poison get into khan, and who could have been responsible? the answers may rest in khan's stomach. it's one reason the medical examiner wants his body exhumed. one of the things you would clearly focus on is what was the last meal or the last food consumed. would that be of interest? >> any autopsy looks at the gastric contents. in some cases we analyze if it's relevant to the case. in this case, we would be looking at the gastric content, but that's part of any forensic autopsy. >> khan's widow is 32 years old and she's now inside running the family business. i asked her for an interview, but she said she's simply not ready to talk. she did tell me that she and her husband were very much in love and that she supports the exhumation of his body, hoping it will reveal the trut
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> "raw politics" now and a war of words breaking out over president obama's pick for secretary of defense. he's chuck hagel. >> chuck knows war is not a distraction. he understands that sending young americans to fight and bleed in the dirt and mud, that's something we only do when it's absolutely necessary. my frame of reference, he has said, is geared towards the guy at the bottom who is doing the fighting and the dying. >> senator hagel, though, may not have an easy confirmation. here is the reaction today from senator john mccain, a one-time political ally who once considered hagel as a running mate. quote. i have serious concerns about the positions senator hagel has taken on a range of critical issues in recent years which we will fully consider in the course of the confirmation process. he's talking about military action against iran, his willingness to consider cuts to the defense budget and most explosive perhaps past statements on the pro-israel lobby. >> i'm a united states senator, not an israeli senato
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> the horrific rape case that has sparked protest in india and outraged around the world moved closer to trial. the picture of the five suspects in the van was the only video from today. that's because there was so much chaos inside the courtroom, that a magistrate sealed the proceedings off. she also slapped a gag order on reporters. we'll have more on that in a moment. first, the rage of this attack is unleashed. it is important to talk about, and it is really extraordinary, the reaction. you have to keep in mind rape is very common in india. in 2011, there were more than 24,000 reported rapes. that's according to the national crime record's bureau. that's one rape every 22 minutes. those are only reported cases. experts say many more cases go unreported. the typical response, though, by authorities is actually to turn a blind eye or even blame the victim. not this time, apparently. here is randi kaye. >> reporter: we don't know her name, but we know her story inspired this, outrage. on december 1
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. it's part of what you slove about her.essing. but your erectile dysfunction - you know, that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sexual activity. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as this may cause an unsafe drop in bloopressure. do not drink alcohol in excess with cialis. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. if you have any sudden decrease or loss in hearing or vision, or if you have any allergic reactions such as rash, hives,
, we want you to tell us what you think of our science coverage in a new poll. find both at "lunch in the lab." jeff brown talks to "washington post" film critic ann hornaday about the surprises and shutouts in this year's oscar nominations. and we profile an entrepreneur who built a web site for citizens to report and get responses to problems in their community. all that and more is on our web site, newshour.pbs.org. judy. >> woodruff: and that's the newshour for tonight. on monday, we'll look at the lifting of travel restrictions for cubans some 50 years after fidel castro put them in place. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. "washington week" can be seen later this evening on most pbs stations. we'll see you online, and again here monday evening. have a nice weekend. thanks for joining us. good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to
societies use religion a lot more explanation, now science provided the explanations of why there's tides and why the sun seems to go across the sky. so there's a function of religion that has become lost with time. religion still has its function of offering comfort, of helping deal with anxiety. religion used to have a function of teaching us to obey the king or obey the president. the reasons that we obey the president today are not because of religion but because of the rule of law. >> interesting. professor jared diamond, thank you so much for all of that. >> you are welcome. >>> and up next, coughing, sneezing and wheezing. the flu outbreak infecting the nation. >> excuse me. >> how facebook -- well timed there, s.e. facebook helping some fight back. we'll explain it next. ♪ i'd like to thank eating right, whole grain, multigrain cheerios! mom, are those my jeans? [ female announcer ] people who choose more whole grain tend to weigh less than those who don't. multigrain cheerios constipated? yeah. mm. some laxatives like dulcolax can cause cramps. but phillips' caplets don't. they
aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. why let constipation stry miralax.? mirlax works differently than other laxatives. it draws water into your colon to unblock your system naturally. don't wait to feel great. miralax. >>> back to "hardball." now to the "sideshow." yesterday i told you about a silly concern that's popped up about jack lew being nominated for secretary of the treasury. his signature if confirmed. that, that's the signature that would end up at the bottom of our paper money. look at that thing. that can't be. at today's nomination ceremony president obama didn't let that topic of his crazy signature slide. >> i had never noticed jack's signature, and when this was highlighted yesterday in the press, i considered rescinding my offer to appoint him. jack assures me that he is going to work to make at least one letter legible in order not to debase our currency should he be confirmed as secretary of the treasury. >> well, there is some hope. tim geithner had a messy sig
shell for being willing to cooperate on getting to the science. but as i told marvin before we stepped out onstage, in colorado, you know, just repeatedly now, shell has been there calling for stronger regulations of its own industry, agreeing with e.d.f. on how to go forward in a way that really is very meritorious. so i just want to thank you, marvin, for what shell is doing on this topic. [applause] >> you mentioned the -- that there would need to be a mix of energy. you mentioned nuclear. is there a danger that the extraordinary growth of unconventional gas and oil in america creates a sense of abundance and no longer a need to worry about renewables that marvin talked about, and nuclear, for example? >> it's certainly having an impact on investment and research and development, there's no question about it. it has slowed down. we were something like 17 nuclear reactors being considered just to keep us at 20%. nuclear is 20% of our world power mix today and that's backed off. we have four being built in the country. but you see that happening. the thing we have to worry about, agai
to the customer through actuarial science and through claims management. our new role is to create an integrated delivery model driven by primary care providers that uses shared data at the point of care to improve outcomes, lower costs and create a better health care experience. at humana, our model integrates our delivery, data support for clip in additions -- clinicians and wellness and productivity platforms. and in many ways our motto is an evolution with its roots prevalent 20 or 30 years ago. but today simplicity is the key. we believe in integrated delivery model that emphasizes primary care can provide outcomes, lower the cost of care -- especially to patients with critical or complex medical needs, including patients in the medicare and medicaid program. the concept relies on primary care physicians to coordinate care for patients, helping them navigate the health care system so they can receive the right care at the right place at the right time. like many organizations and industries, technology plays such an important role in enabling this to happen. we are investing in today in dat
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